Friday, May 30, 2008

Suburban Gardening


My oldest son decided he wanted a garden this year and honestly, I probably wouldn't have done anything had he not insisted despite the fact that I designed our backyard to have a very small plot for the express purpose of a garden. When you have two young children and work almost full-time, planting a garden is lower on the list than say, getting some rest. But, I want my boys to appreciate Mother Earth and I also want some fresh produce and who knows, maybe I'll save some money but already my watering bill has gone up so I doubt it. I'm rambling. I've included a photo of said garden and you might be wondering where the vegetables are. If you can't see them, then that's perfect! I'm trying to keep it hidden from the rabbits who are proliferating like, yes, rabbits. The weeds currently perfectly obscure the vegetables. We're growing corn, beans, tomatoes, and, if I remember to get some, basil. It would perfect if I could grow a mozzarella bush! I can just taste the promise of Caprese salad this summer. Yum!

3 comments:

Momma said...

I keep meaning to post pictures of my garden too.

Just a quick hint. If you put cayenne pepper on the plants, the rabbits won't touch them. You can do this one of two ways. Get a bottle of ground red pepper and sprinkle it all over, or you can mix cayenne pepper solution in a water bottle and spray it on the plants. The animals won't eat it then.

Also, if you plant hot peppers around the perimeter of the other plants, they'll avoid it then to.

Good luck with the gardening!

FrugalMomLA said...

That's a great idea! Thanks for sharing. I'll do that!

Leila said...

I, too have a smallish garden. It's a self-water container garden, preferable so I don't have to weed as much and guess at how much water is needed. Having an infant does not leave much time for anything else except what can fit in between tiny pockets of time. It's real nice to be able to grow your own tomatoes, beans, peppers and greens, etc without having to pay the grocery price. the start-up, water, energy and effort costs can make you wonder if it is worth it. you can't beat the great feeling of watching your plants grow and help feed you/family.